Major Robert F. Burns

90th Division, U.S. Army

 

War Letters from Europe

Normandy to Germany

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Letters from France

June 22, 1944
June 29, 1944
June 29, 1944 (2nd)
July 6, 1944
July 17, 1944
August 10, 1944
August 14, 1944
August 25, 1944
September 1, 1944
September 2, 1944
September 3, 1944
September 3, 1944 (2nd)
September 14, 1944
September 16, 1944
September 16, 1944 (2nd)
September 17, 1944
September 28, 1944
October 2, 1944
October 14, 1944
October 22, 1944
November 2, 1944
November 12, 1944
November 24, 1944
December 2, 1944
December 27, 1944

Letters from Luxembourg

January 9, 1945
January 16, 1945
January 20, 1945

Letter from Belgium

February 7, 1945

Letters from Germany

February 9, 1945
February 21, 1945
February 23, 1945
February 26, 1945
April 5, 1945
May 5, 1945

Letters from Czechoslovakia

May 10, 1945
May 16, 1945

Letters from Germany

May 19, 1945
May 20, 1945
May 24, 1945
June 3, 1945
June 22, 1945

Letters from France

June 30, 1945
July 3, 1945

Letters from Germany

July 14, 1945
July 27, 1945
July 30, 1945
August 3, 1945
August 14, 1945

Letters from France

August 26, 1945
August 28, 1945
August 29, 1945

Letters from Germany

September 9, 1945
September 11, 1945
September 13, 1945
September 15, 1945
September 17, 1945
September 23, 1945
September 27, 1945
October 1, 1945
October 9, 1945

Letters from France

October 13, 1945
October 15, 1945
October 22, 1945
November 5, 1945
November 17, 1945
November 17, 1945 (2nd)
November 23, 1945
November 30, 1945
December 17, 1945
December 17, 1945 (2nd)
December 18, 1945
December 26, 1945
January 2, 1946

Letters from Belgium

January 14, 1946
January 15, 1946
January 17, 1946
January 17, 1946 (2nd)

Letters from France

January 21, 1946
January 24, 1946

Regensburg, Germany

September 11, 1945

Dear Mom,

My eye is coming along nicely. It is still very red but the burning soreness is gone. This afternoon the doctor said they would discontinue the penicillin shots. For this I am most thankful. They were beginning to have a most unpleasant sting. I've had so many holes put in me that I feel I should be bleeding from all sides. I mean that literally, for they've punched me all over - both arms and my seat. Each nurse has her own idea of where they go best. I don't like any of them.

Worst of all was getting waked up at 5:30 or 6:00 a.M. to get shot and take my pills. Fortunately, they skipped the one a.m. period.

I always think of Lt. Coghill when I visited him in the hospital last fall. "Don't ever let your bare arm hang out" he said "for everyone who passes by will poke a needle in it." It's not quite that bad but I'm glad I don't get any more even though they apparently do the trick.

According to our visitors the hegira to the U.S. is in full swing. Apparently a sizeable batch is being shipped out of Corps to other units going back and in a few weeks Corps itself will be gone - dissipated out to other units. I just hope it lasts until I can get to school. I don't want to switch units for that brief time.

Oddly enough the hospital does not object to my reading and I have been doing quite a bit, mostly the little pocket books the Army publishes. I mention this because of one book which interested me very much. Its title is "Hotel Splendide" and it is by Ludwig Bemelmans. It is interesting for not being merely entertaining (which it is) but because it has a chapter on Regensburg from where the author comes. I came on this unwittingly and was pleased to read his brief account of the town. He mentions the restaurant of the Hotel Maximilian as being the best in Regensburg. The restaurant, of course, is a thing of the past, but the hotel, I am sure, is the now hyphenated Park-Maximilian at which I stay. It still has an air of grandiose ness, somewhat faded to be sure. I must look at it more carefully when I get back.

The stone bridge across the Danube I don't place but it is now defunct in any event in company with other bridges across that stream except where the American Army has flung across a military passageway.

Love,

Bob

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