Major Robert F. Burns

90th Division, U.S. Army

 

War Letters from Europe

Normandy to Germany

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Letters from France

June 22, 1944
June 29, 1944
June 29, 1944 (2nd)
July 6, 1944
July 17, 1944
August 10, 1944
August 14, 1944
August 25, 1944
September 1, 1944
September 2, 1944
September 3, 1944
September 3, 1944 (2nd)
September 14, 1944
September 16, 1944
September 16, 1944 (2nd)
September 17, 1944
September 28, 1944
October 2, 1944
October 14, 1944
October 22, 1944
November 2, 1944
November 12, 1944
November 24, 1944
December 2, 1944
December 27, 1944

Letters from Luxembourg

January 9, 1945
January 16, 1945
January 20, 1945

Letter from Belgium

February 7, 1945

Letters from Germany

February 9, 1945
February 21, 1945
February 23, 1945
February 26, 1945
April 5, 1945
May 5, 1945

Letters from Czechoslovakia

May 10, 1945
May 16, 1945

Letters from Germany

May 19, 1945
May 20, 1945
May 24, 1945
June 3, 1945
June 22, 1945

Letters from France

June 30, 1945
July 3, 1945

Letters from Germany

July 14, 1945
July 27, 1945
July 30, 1945
August 3, 1945
August 14, 1945

Letters from France

August 26, 1945
August 28, 1945
August 29, 1945

Letters from Germany

September 9, 1945
September 11, 1945
September 13, 1945
September 15, 1945
September 17, 1945
September 23, 1945
September 27, 1945
October 1, 1945
October 9, 1945

Letters from France

October 13, 1945
October 15, 1945
October 22, 1945
November 5, 1945
November 17, 1945
November 17, 1945 (2nd)
November 23, 1945
November 30, 1945
December 17, 1945
December 17, 1945 (2nd)
December 18, 1945
December 26, 1945
January 2, 1946

Letters from Belgium

January 14, 1946
January 15, 1946
January 17, 1946
January 17, 1946 (2nd)

Letters from France

January 21, 1946
January 24, 1946

Regensburg, Germany

September 17, 1945

Dear Marn,

Your letter came at an opportune moment just as I was writing to wish you a Happy Birthday! If my account is as large as you say, you ought to be able to get yourself a suitable present out of it. Knowing your interest in diamonds I window-shopped while in Paris. For very tiny stones, the cheapest items started at 25,000 francs ($500) and went on from there. Needless to say I didn't purchase any!

Now for your questions:

1. No I did not see the gold found by the Division. I was too busy at the time to get down there and within a day or two following the unsealing of the chamber, we were 50 miles beyond there, leaving a unit behind to guard it.

2. For the same reason I did not see the art treasures which were also in the mine. They were all crated and only one or two were opened for examination. Within a few days both art treasures and gold were loaded on trucks and sent to Supreme Headquarters. Our unit then returned to us. We were by then some 100 miles beyond.

3. a. Months in Service - 55

b. Months overseas - 18

c. Battle Stars (five) - 25

d. Decorations (one Silver Star, One Bronze Star, One Oak Leaf Cluster to Bronze Star) - 15

Total - 113 points (This is my new score which was just checked today)

4. I still have only one Distinguished Unit Citation. The one proposed for the Div has never been awarded. Note that this award like the Combat Infantryman Badge and Bronze Invasion Arrowhead which I also have do not carry any points.

5. To the best of my knowledge all Divisions used their Division number as their APO number. We were APO90. The 45th Div was APO45. The 9th Div was APO9, etc. With troops attached to an Army however as Anti-aircraft Bns, etc. the situation is different. They all use the Army APO number.

6. Both Corps and Army have APO numbers which indicate their status. The exact system I am not familiar with. It is somewhat similar to the system used to designate units in which the number tells the type of unit, branch of service, etc. Again, I am not familiar with the system, having no need for the information.

7. XII Corps like any other Corps is an intermediate headquarters between Army and Divisions. Its composition varies according to the tactical needs and situation. Generally it includes a group of troops - engineers, medics, artillery, etc. who support the operations of the attached Divisions. Usually one or more infantry or armored divisions is attached to the Corps. There is no fixed rule. Our Division, for example, was in VII Corps, VIII Corps, XV Corps, XX Corps, III Corps, VIII Corps and XII Corps depending upon where we were. Notice that Corps are always written in Roman numerals. In short, a Corps is higher than a Division and lower than an Army.

8. I had a week in Paris. Actually eight days.

9. My time for taking pictures has been practically nil. I still have my cartridges loaded with exposed film.

Love,

Bob

P.S. I made my application for discontinuance of my allotment effective 30 Sept.

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